Tuesday, August 22, 2017

re-reading the "boring parts"


When I was ordained this summer, someoneI don't remember whoplaced a Bible in my hands, The Wesley Study Bible, a CEB (Common English Bible). Having never read the CEB or the Wesley Study Bible, I decided to give it a go. I've been jumping around, but I'm reading through Isaiah right now.

Isaiah, like many of the other prophets, includes a generous helping of "oracles against the nations" (Isaiah 13-23)"Moab is undone," "Wail, O ships of Tarshish," that sort of thing.
I feel like, for the average Joe picking up a Bible, this stuff must be some of the most mind-numbing material in the book, just a little better than a genealogy or Levitical legal minutia. Chapter after chapter of accusations and judgments passed on ancient nations you've probably never heard of. How are people supposed to get through this? What are they supposed to glean from all these accounts of distant, dusty, national transgressions?

And yet, as I've been reading, the scriptures have been surprising me. (Imagine that.)

Like in Isaiah 16:
The daughters of Moab
at the fords of the Arnon
are like orphaned birds
pushed from the nest.
Consider carefully, act justly;
at high noon
provide your shade like night.
Hide the outcasts;
keep the fugitives hidden.
Let the outcasts of Moab live among you.
Be a hiding place for them
from the destroyer. (16:2-4)
"My heart cries out for Moab. Its fugitives flee to Zoar..." says the prophet of the Lord God of Israel (15:5). God's concern for these Moabite refugees may be the most urgent picture of God's love for immigrants in the Old Testament.

A love the Church in America has largely forgotten.
How many refugees are there now, I wonder, who are running for their lives and their families lives, living in camps, praying to their gods that the "Christian nation" across the Atlantic would "act justly" and be their shade from the noon sun, from the radicals and terror cooking them alive in their homelands?

Perhaps these oracles against the nations in Isaiah can speak to other nations, later nations, today.

Then I was reading Isaiah's judgment on Damascus, in the next chaptera judgment that touches Israel too (17:4-6)where the prophet says:
On that day, people will have regard
for their maker,
and their eyes will look
to the holy one of Israel.
They will have no regard for altars,
the work of their hands,
or look to what their fingers made:
sacred poles and incense stands. (17:7-8)
The work of our hands, the things our fingers have made that we look to.
Today, those are aren't altars, sacred poles, and incense stands. Not literally, at least. Today Isaiah's warning might sound something like this:
On that day, people will have regard
for their maker,
and their eyes will look
to the holy one of Israel.
They will have no regard for smartphones and 401Ks,
the work of their hands,
or look to what their fingers made:
goal posts and Valentino flats and Netflix Original Series.
Idolatry may look different now, but where your treasure is, there your heart will be also (Matt 6:21).

It's easy to label scripture and dismiss itmind-numbing, irrelevant, boringbut, you know... maybe all scripture really is God-breathed and useful (1 Tim 3:16). Maybe we need to leave no stone unturned and mine this sacred book for precious jewels. Maybe what the Church really needs today is the "boring parts" of Isaiah.

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